Pressure Canning Refried Beans

This article discusses pressure canning refried beans. Preserving your own food can be a quick and easy way to save money and provide your family with healthy meals. And refried beans can be used in so many dishes, like quesadillas, nachos, tacos and alongside enchiladas.
When I first started canning, I knew that trying to can everything at one time, to replace all of my store bought items, was going to be way too much. It was overwhelming just thinking about it. But I wanted healthier items in our pantry so I no longer had to feed my family all sorts of chemicals and other ingredients I didn’t want in our diet.
As frustrating as it was to get started slowly, I knew that’s what had to be done, and it’s what I recommend to everyone just getting started. So we considered what we used the most of in all of our meals, and hands down, we bought and used more refried beans than anything else. So that was it. I was canning refried beans first. Pasta sauce was next on the list and you can see how I can that right here.

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So many websites say that it’s impossible to can refried beans or that it’s not safe. The only reason that people believe that is because refried beans are typically mashed and mashed refried beans would be so thick that air would not be able to get through it to can it safely. But in truth, refried beans are one of the easiest items to can. You simply load up your jars with soaked whole pinto beans and veggies and then worry about mashing them once you’re ready to use them.
Let’s see how I did it!
I started by filling up a large pot with dried beans, and water all the way up to the brim, the night before. We want the beans to soak up as much water as possible before we can them.
The next morning, set up your canning station and rinse your beans. You’ll need a pressure canner, a large pot to make your sauce, quart canning jars, canning supplies, and a large ladle.
Then I fill each of my quart jars with my soaked pinto beans. As we need room for the veggies we will add in with our beans, we are only filling our jars about 3/4 full.
In our large sauce pot, we’ll need about 12 cups of water.
Add in your chili powder and paprika to your water on the stove.
And add in your salt and cumin. Stir and turn the heat to high. You want hot liquid going into each of your jars.
To each jar, add one clove of minced garlic, and chop your onions. I used my dehydrated onions for speed and efficiency.
Now add 1/3 cup onions to each jar.
Tamp down each jar on the counter to pack everything in. If there’s still room in each jar, add more pintos up to the bottom of the neck of each jar. Then fill your jars with sauce up to the same point.
Wipe the rims of your jars with a damp washcloth and add lids.
Finally add rings, but only twist until you feel the slightest resistance.
Fill your pressure canner with 3 quarts of water and load your jars.
My canner fits 7 quarts. You don’t want them touching the sides of the pot or the other jars while processing.
Lock the cover on and turn the heat to the setting just below the highest. When you see the steam coming out the top, give it ten more minutes to vent. Then add your weighted rocker. When the rocker starts going, set your timer to 90 minutes and turn the heat down to medium to medium high. You want the temperature as low as possible without stopping the rocker.
This article discusses pressure canning refried beans. Preserving your own food can be a quick and easy way to save money and provide your family with healthy meals. And refried beans can be used in so many dishes, like quesadillas, nachos, tacos and alongside enchiladas.
Follow the recipe below for more details about the middle and end of the process.
Servings:
7 quarts of beans
 
Cook Time
Processing Time: 90 minutes
Total Time: 4 hours
Ingredients
About 21 cups of soaked pinto beans
12 cups of water
1 clove of garlic per quart
1/3 chopped onion per quart
1.5 tablespoons chili powder
4 teaspoons salt
2 tablespoons paprika
1 tablespoon cumin
Instructions
1. You’ll want to start by filling a large pot about halfway with pinto beans and then to the top with water (the night before you want to can).
2. Your pinto beans need to soak overnight. If you need to split them into different containers and give them more water, that’s fine. You want them to get as much water as they need before canning or they will expand inside your jars.
3. When you are ready to can the next day, begin by setting up your canning station. You’ll need a pressure canner, a large pot for your seasonings, quart size canning jars, canning supplies, a ladle, and several towels.
4. Let’s get your sauce going. In the large empty pot for your seasonings, measure out the 12 cups of water and your spices, and stir to mix.
5. Heat your seasoned water on medium-low heat until pretty hot.
6. In the meantime, pour your soaked beans into a strainer in the sink and rinse them really well before taking them over to your jars.
7. Now its time to fill all of your jars with pinto beans using your funnel. Normally you would fill your jars to the bottom of the neck of the jars. But this time, only fill your jars 3/4 of the way do you have room for minced garlic and onions.
8. Add the minced garlic and chopped onions to each jar, filling with more beans if necessary to reach the bottom of the jar necks.
8. Once your jars are filled with beans and veggies, ladle the seasoned water you made over the top, filling the jars just to the bottom of the necks.
9. Wipe the rims of your jars with a damp washcloth to remove any liquid or debris.
10. Set a brand-new lid on top of each jar and then twist a ring over each one. Only twist the rings until you feel the slightest bit of resistance.
11. Fill your pressure cooker with 3 quarts of water, or to the bottom fill line inside your pot.
12. Turn the heat on to the setting just below high.
13. Load your jars into the canner with your jar lifter. My canner holds 7 quart jars. Make sure the jars don’t touch any part of the canner or each other.
14. Place the lid on top and twist to lock it into place.
15. The pot will build up pressure inside and start steaming out the top.
16. At this time, set your timer for 10 minutes and let the pot vent. The air lock on the top of the lid will even pop.
17. When the timer goes off, put your canner weight over the vent and wait some more.
18. When the weight begins rocking back and forth, you’ll set your timer for 90 minutes and turn the heat down to just above medium. You’re trying to achieve a slow rock without letting it stop.
19. If it stops rocking, you’ll need to get it rocking again and then restart your timer.
20. When the timer goes off, turn off the heat and let it cool completely down.
21. When the pressure inside the canner comes down enough, the air lock will go down, about an hour and a half.
22. At this time, remove the weight and let cool another 10 minutes before removing the top.
23. Pull the jars out with your jar lifter and set them aside on a towel to cool for 24 hours. At this time you can start the process all over again and can another round if you’d like.
24. Your jars will start popping letting you know they’re sealing. If one or two do not seal, put them in the refrigerator and use them within a few days. However, if four or more jars don’t seal, remove the lids and rings, clean the rims and process them again.
25. Store them in a cool, dry place without their rings. If left on, liquid or food particles under the rings could compromise your jars.
The pressure and cook times will be different for various altitudes, jar sizes and food items. See the chart below for your area. I’m currently at 5,500 ft elevation. 
Table 1. Recommended process time for Beans in a dial-gauge pressure canner.
Canner Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes of
Style of Pack Jar Size Process Time 0 – 2,000 ft 2,001 – 4,000 ft 4,001 – 6,000 ft 6,001 – 8,000 ft
Raw Pints 75 min 11lb 12lb 13lb 14lb
Quarts 90 min 11lb 12lb 13lb 14lb

 

Table 2. Recommended process time for Beans in a weighted-gauge pressure canner.
Canner Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes of
Style of pack Jar Size Process Time 0 – 1,000 ft Above 1,000 ft
Raw Pints 75 min 10lb 15lb
Quarts 90 min 10lb 15lb
This article discusses pressure canning refried beans. Preserving your own food can be a quick and easy way to save money and provide your family with healthy meals. And refried beans can be used in so many dishes, like quesadillas, nachos, tacos and alongside enchiladas.
And for nutrition facts for homemade canned refried beans, see the chart below.
Nutrition Facts
Serving size: 1
Calories 100
Calories from Fat 18
% Daily Value *
Fat 2 g 3%
Saturated fat 0 g
Unsaturated fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 13 g 4%
Sugar 1 g
Fiber 3 g 12%
Protein 4 g 8%
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 30 mg 1%
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs. The values here may not be 100% accurate because the recipes have not been professionally evaluated nor have they been evaluated by the U.S. FDA.
Related Recipes:
It’s really nice having refried beans around anytime we’d like. We use ours for tacos, alongside enchiladas, and even in our quesadillas. When it’s time to use them, simply use a jar opener to pop the top and dump your beans into a large pot. You may want to add a bit of water and turn the heat to medium.
Using a potato masher preferably, smash your beans down as the cook, periodically scraping the bottom of the pot so they don’t burn. Keep smashing until the beans are the consistency you want. Yum! Fun tip: If you want to put them on nachos, water down the portion you want to use before pouring them on.

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This article discusses pressure canning refried beans. Preserving your own food can be a quick and easy way to save money and provide your family with healthy meals. And refried beans can be used in so many dishes, like quesadillas, nachos, tacos and alongside enchiladas.

 

 

 

 

 


4 thoughts on “Pressure Canning Refried Beans”

  • These are really great tips. Loved how detailed the instructions is. Thanks for sharing ♥️ ♥️ By any chance you are interested on doing collaborations, you can check out the collaborations portal of Phlanx.com and connect with amazing brands!

    Xoxo,
    Tiffany

    • Oh man. I couldn’t tell you. We go through so many jars of pintos, baked beans, and refried beans over here all year long, that I simply pour until I half fill my largest pot, and then fill the rest with water. When I feel like I have enough jars of one recipe, I switch to another recipe and keep going. If I run out before making all of the beans I want to can for the year, I will simply soak more.

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